Jimmy Fallon and The Joy of the Lord (Guest Post by Ben Gosden)

Late Night With Jimmy Fallon - Season 4“If you don’t stand for something, you’ll fall for anything.”

I don’t really know who first said those words. It’s been used by many speakers and writers and thinkers over the years to instill a sense of urgency and passion in others. However no one can seem to pinpoint the true origin of the quote. Yet it doesn’t deter people from using this quip whenever it’s necessary to emphasize the importance of a point or, better yet, when you want to plant your flag on a proverbial hill and fight anyone who would challenge your stance. After all, it seems being a jerk is okay so long as you’re “standing for something” in the process.

I count myself among the throng of people thrilled to see The Tonight Show be turned over to Jimmy Fallon. I’m not a Jay Leno hater. I just never connected with him. But Jimmy Fallon has brilliantly endeared himself to me as a child of the 90s with his clever references to pop culture, music, etc. of the last 20 years. He speaks my language. More than that, Jimmy Fallon’s style of hosting The Tonight Show as a sketch comedy, candid moments with stars, fan-centered, hilarious hour of television has done something more profound than just entertain me. It has inspired me.

You see, I’ve always been a diehard fan of The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. I DVR it and will often binge a week of episodes on a Saturday morning. Stewart is brilliant. And I love the way he uses sarcasm to speak truth to power. But here’s the thing: the longer I watched his show and other news-oriented shows on cable, etc. I found myself growing more and more cynical. After about two weeks of getting into Jimmy Fallon’s tenure on The Tonight Show, I realized that I was hooked not because his show was just entertaining, but because that entertainment comes from a place of pure joy and spontaneity. Whether he’s trying to keep a string of one-liners going with Higgins no matter how zany and funny it becomes; whether he’s putting an A-list star in the most awkward and silly position playing a game; or whether it’s getting a musical star to do a duet with him using real or even kid instruments Jimmy Fallon knows how to create something special and joyful. And quite often it’s beautiful.

So what does this have to do with The United Methodist Church and how we take our stands?

Well for starters, what if instead of picking teams, dividing camps, and throwing salvos across the bow at one another, we took a stronger stand for joy? What if instead of constantly instilling a sense of bitterness and cynicism in one another and feeding off of it, we tried to find space to laugh or be silly or even love?

I think a couple of things could happen.

First, to share joy means we have to put our opinions and judgments on hold long enough to actually get to know someone beyond just what we know about their opinions. This is not easy, but it’s certainly rewarding. One of my favorite people to visit with at annual conference and clergy events every year is an older clergy colleague who, if you lined up 10 issues, probably would disagree with me on 9 out of 10. But a couple of years ago he sought me out at a meeting, shared his heart, acknowledged our points of disagreement and we’ve been friends ever since. He showed me that it’s possible to love another person even if you don’t agree with them. And I’m grateful to him.

Secondly, sharing joy means we might shift the language of our denomination. Instead of sky is falling, schism-shaped language, we could begin to use language based on love, joy, and peace. Instead of hunting heresy we might discover Holy Spirit moments where we find ourselves surprised by the joy we can find when we let down our guard a little and truly share with another person. We might begin speaking a language of hope to a cynical world that longs for something to hope in — and maybe that even means turning Twitter off that forum tempts us to break the first two General Rules: Do No Harm and Do Good.

I know late-night TV is probably a silly metaphor for how we should live together. But it’s the best I can come up with right now. You see, I find myself longing for hope and joy because ministry is hard and loving others (and especially those I disagree with) can be even harder. And I’m weary after days of following major gatherings like Connectional Table discussions on human sexuality and all you can find via social media is an exchange of verbal grenades and digital bombs being launched at others who don’t share our views.

Jesus didn’t make his kind of sacrificial love optional — even when it means my stances and opinions are the burnt sacrifice on the altar. So my daily prayer is for us to lay down our swords, jump the fence surrounding our camps, and meet on common ground. And maybe for once we could not talk with our checklist of heresies of things that offend us in our front pocket ready to whip out at a moment’s notice. Maybe we can laugh a little, cry a little, share, serve, and even learn from one another. Maybe we can discover joy together and with God. And maybe, just maybe, we’ll begin to discover through our common life and service what it truly means to be Church.

Ben is an Associate Pastor at Mulberry Street United Methodist Church in Macon, GA. He blogs at mastersdust.com and you can follow him on twitter @bgosden.

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3 thoughts on “Jimmy Fallon and The Joy of the Lord (Guest Post by Ben Gosden)

  1. Very true. One of my favorite parishioners would be very opposed to me on all the issues if we focused on that, but we deeply love and respect each other. He’s in my Bible study. He’s teaching me as much as I’m teaching him. And it doesn’t have to mean that we become identical politically. When I stay out of toxic Methodist social media space and stick to my in-real-life relationships with people from my congregation who are all over the map theologically, I really don’t feel nearly as depressed about the future of Methodism.

    1. Morgan, I hear you. I have excellent conversations with friends and colleagues on all sides face-to-face, but something about the electronic medium seems to militate against this.

  2. Great post Ben. Are we feeding ourselves with things that enrage us or make us cynical, or are we feeding ourselves with content, people, media that inspire us. And what are we creating, radiating, and passing on to other people?

    I’m not sure if you’ve seen the Rend Collective’s introduction to their new album, but I think you’ll appreciate it.

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